Give Your Easter Menu A Makeover

Easter dinner has a tendency to be really redundant. Every year, it’s exactly the same as the last. Same time of day. Same guests. Same menu. I get that some aspects of such a dinner are traditional, but an identical meal year after year can be pretty predictable. In other words, it’s just plain boring. (And I’m not knocking your ham, Mom. It just might be nice to see something different at Easter once in a decade.)

Easter-Ham

That said, check out these recipes that are sure to give your dinner an update:

The Center of Attention

1. Porchetta

Deliciously savory and amazingly juicy, this classic Italian pork recipe will easily take center stage on your table. It’s a process – but man, is it worth it. After draping and wrapping pieces of pork together into one delicious roast, seasoning it with herbs like fresh sage and thyme, then roasting it in an oven with a low temperature for a few hours, you’ll have a main attraction that will make your guests swoon.

2. Lamb

Maybe you already serve lamb at your gathering, and that’s nice and all, but that doesn’t mean it’s exempt from an update. Wrap it with bacon, stud it with garlic, top it with a honey-curry glaze – just do something different.

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Simple Ways To Cut Calories While Eating Out

With the hum of soft music, the lure of a beautifully designed menu, and the aroma of delicious foods wafting to your nostrils, a restaurant’s ambiance can sometimes blind you from what you’re eating, elegantly arranging a caloric death trap. But before you put the nail on your calorie coffin, check out these astoundingly simple tips that allow you to enjoy your meal without worry.

Diet

1. Skip the Bread.

Sure, bread tastes great, but the calories it contains aren’t. While a single breadstick from Olive Garden only contains 150 calories, let’s be honest and admit that one isn’t going to cut it. They’re just so good! But eating 2 or 3 breadsticks makes you quickly rake in the calories and leaves less room in your stomach for vegetables that show up with your entrée. Best bet: avoid the bread and enjoy your whole meal.

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Worst EVER Thanksgiving Turkey Recipes

We understand that people like different things. After all, that’s why there’s such a variety of cuisines in the world (for which we are grateful). But there’s a plethora of recipes that, for one reason or another, appall the masses – many of them for Thanksgiving turkeys. So this November, give your guests something to be extra thankful for by not serving any of these birds.

The More the Merrier

True Love Roast

Hope you’ve brought your appetite! The extravagant True Love Roast is comprised of 12 different birds – turkey, goose, chicken, pheasant, partridge, pigeon squab, Aylesbury duck, Barbary duck, poussin, guinea fowl, mallard, and quail – along with an array of different stuffing mixes. At 50,000 calories and 50-ish pounds, this impressive arrangement of protein serves 125 people. Take that, Turducken.

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The History Of Utensils

Confession: I cannot hold chopsticks properly.  Somehow, I weave my middle finger between the two sticks, bestowing little control, and allowing me to navigate my food anywhere but into my mouth.  Due to this deficiency, I no longer allow myself to go out to sushi bars, Chinese restaurants, hibachi places, or any such establishment where my ineptitude is displayed.

Chopsticks

But this is a conundrum, as I dearly love sushi.  So, on a quest to remedy my problem, I began to wonder who in the world created these sticks, and where the rest of flatware came from.  Initially, I thought that chopsticks were probably the oldest utensils since they seem the most simplistic, but I was way off…by thousands of years.

Hands down, spoons take the cake as the oldest eating utensil, next to fingers, of course.  Spoons can be dated back to the Paleolithic period, before the woolly rhinoceroses went extinct.  In other words, they’ve been around for a while.  It’s thought that the spoon most likely originated in southern Europe.  The Greek and Latin words for “spoon” come from the word cochlea, meaning a spiral shaped snail shell, so you can then guess what the first spoons were made of.  In ancient Egypt, spoons were made mainly of ivory, flint, slate, and different woods, while Greeks and Romans fashioned theirs out of bronze and silver.  In Medieval times, spoons were made of cow horns, wood, brass and pewter.  Of course, there were fancy ones too, made of silver and gold, but they were reserved for nobles and royalty.

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