Foods You’re Told Not to Eat, but Really Should

Bad reputations are often really hard to shake. Once set in place, people seem to have that same perception forever. I guess you can’t really blame them (we’re all guilty of holding onto what we know) but sometimes what we know is pretty far from the truth. Like people, certain foods can get thought the worst of. We think we know what they’re all about, but in reality, what we think of them is totally wrong. These foods have received a lot of criticism over the years, though most of it is undeserved (and somewhat harsh):

Fruit Or Chocolate

Chocolate

People think that because it’s so delicious, this temptress just has to be bad for you. Plus, it’s chock full of sugar. Well guess what chocolate, you can remove your scarlet letter. Studies show that a single serving of cocoa has more powerful antioxidants than green tea, black tea, and red wine. Plus chocolate boosts your memory, and is full of flavinoids, which help increase blood flow to the skin, making it look real nice. (Learn more about Chocolate)

Eggs

Sure, they’re jam-packed with cholesterol but that’s the only real downside. They’re one of the only foods to supply naturally occurring vitamin D, have only around 80 calories, and contain all nine essential amino acids. Suddenly, eggs aren’t sounding too bad, right? And, eggs are running some pretty good beauty promotions. They’re shown to promote healthy hair and nails because of their high sulfur content and numerous vitamins and minerals. (Learn more about Eggs)

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Strange Easter Traditions

I was under the illusion that we didn’t have any strange traditions in America. But then I started thinking about it – about the strange things we do around the holidays – and I realized we have some really bizarre rituals. Basing warm weather on a groundhog’s shadow? Come on. Who are we? So, since Easter’s on its way, I decided to investigate strange traditions and customs affiliated with the holiday. Here, in America, we have the classic egg rolling competitions, colorfully decorated Easter eggs, and an oversized rabbit that drops off baskets of candy. These traditions sound pretty weird, but in comparison with those from around the globe, the old U.S. of A. is looking pretty tame…

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Things to Never Include in Easter Baskets

Easter Morning: you run into the living room (or wherever you guys stashed your baskets) and there, before your eyes are those brightly wrapped baskets. Decked out with pink cellophane, stuffed with neon green grass, tied ribbons cascading from wicker handles, the basket sits still waiting for you, filled with… things.

Puppy-Easter-Basket

You can’t tell exactly what they are – the things – because your parents strategically wrapped them so that the only way you can discover what treasures await you is to unwrap the basket in its entirety. (Maybe your parents didn’t do this. Maybe you weren’t a nuisance. Maybe this was my parents’ way of getting back at me. Who knows.) So, anyway, your fingers tear at that cellophane. You plunge that fateful hand into the depths of the basket to retrieve fistfuls of candy, small toys, and whatever else your parents deemed worthy.

But that was when you were young. Now, you’re the MC of this Easter ritual. Picking out the right stuffers for an Easter basket sounds like a tricky job, but you’ll do just fine…just stay clear of these awful Easter basket items:

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A Short History of St. Patrick's Day

It's that time of year again. Time to don your favorite green apparel and hit your local pub for some green beer or a pint of Guinness. But why do we celebrate St. Patrick's Day? And what's with all the green?

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The history of St. Patty's day as an official holiday dates back to to 1900's although it was celebrated as a national feast day in Ireland as early as the 10th century. St. Patrick, the most famous patron saint of Ireland, is regarded as the principal missionary in bringing Christianity to Ireland, where he used the leaves of the shamrock to teach the doctrine of the holy trinity.

Originally, the color associated with St. Patrick was blue, but to honor him, people would don a shamrock. Then, during a rebellion in 1798, Irish soldiers wore all green uniforms in hopes of drawing attention and support. This was known as 'wearing of the green'. Eventually green overtook blue, and shamrocks and their green color became the norm for those celebrating the day.

St. Patrick's has since spread to all corners of the world. It is widely popular in Canada, USA, Great Britain, Australia and New Zealand, and is even celebrated in Japan and South Korea.

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